How to Tap Into the Exploding Canadian eCommerce Market

The Canadian eCommerce market has grown 16.8% to 29.6 billion, according to a 2017 eTail Canada report.  Continued growth is expected at 14.8% in 2017.  76% of Canadians are purchasing online, and will be spending 39 billion by the end of 2019 (9.5% of all Canadian retail sales).  Online sales growth in this country has surpassed the US, to a point that American companies are being encouraged to target the Canadian market.  There has never been a better time for any business to tap into online sales.

What’s Working Online in Canada

Customer-Centric Model: Personalization has proven to be an extraordinary success in online sales.  Marketers boast a 760% increase in revenue when shopping experiences are personalized.  That can include something as simple as a coupon based on past purchases, or intricate multi-channel algorithms that analyze each shopper’s buying patterns and utilize that data to provide their ideal shopping experience.

Amazon has been developing ways to personalize the shopper experience for several years. One of their most basic, yet successful tactics is how they utilize customer data, based on both the individual shopper and other shoppers with similar interests.  Even a simple recommendation, like “Other shoppers who purchased this book also purchased…” encourages spontaneous purchases and provides social proof.

The customer-centric model should also be the basis of direct sales campaigns through shoppable social media features, like those offered by Instagram and Facebook.  Social selling allows you to combine what you know about your customers with what the social network knows about your customers. It can be a powerful combination if it’s done right.

Omni-Channel: Most of us are aware that omni-channel is a must for stores to reach their maximum potential.  Now it’s time to focus on how smoothly that process is from start to finish through truly integrated channels.  Today’s hyper-connected consumers expect no less, whether they’re being served online or in-store.

One of the most important components of a smooth omni-channel process is how we reach and engage the mobile shopper.

“Mobile shopping is a major element of omni-channel marketing,” the eTail report states. “Retailers need a mobile-first strategy. And it’s not just about GPS and tracking. It’s about being where the customer is immediately with personalized messages based on browsing behaviors and patterns.”

International Sales:  Canadian eCommerce is often limited to the Canadian market for several reasons.  There is a misguided attitude that we can’t compete with the US for Canadian sales, so the chances of making American sales are slim to none.  However, 72% of Americans who would like to shop across their border are open to buying from Canadian online businesses.

We can also explore markets in countries beyond North America, but it does demand more research into everything from translation to payment options. Still, with all things considered, it has never been easier to sell internationally.

Chances are your efforts will be rewarded if your business is a good fit for international expansion. 14 of the largest Canada-based retailers saw their global web sales grow by 25% in the past year. The low Canadian dollar is driving that interest, but superior handling of international sales and customer service will keep them coming back.

Content: Never, in the history of retail, has content been so critical to the sales process.  Before the social Internet, sales copy and advertising were the sum total of creative presentation. Now, consumers need to be engaged and excited about a product or service.  The level of information they want reaches well beyond facts and spec’s.  They’re no longer sold by slick tactics and flashy ads, they want substance, transparency and honesty.

Savvy online shoppers expect you to help them decide to buy, not push them into a sale.  They want you to solve their problems and that’s the frame of mind they’re in when they start searching online. Exceptional content in all its forms has proven to be so useful in attracting buyers, that 72% of marketers worldwide said relevant content creation was the most effective tactic in search engine optimization (SEO).

Online Sales Work for Canadian Businesses of All Shapes and Sizes

Small-Medium businesses are the backbone of the Canadian economy.  Many are overwhelmed by the opportunities available to them online and paralyzed by intimidation.  But the beauty of eCommerce is that any business can sell online.  You don’t have to be in a prime location or deal with local demands.  The world can be your market just like it is for large businesses.  You can scale as slowly or as quickly as you’re comfortable with.  The investment is nothing compared to the expense involved with opening more locations, yet your reach is virtually limitless.

Today’s online business tools have made it possible for practically anyone to sell online, from home businesses to national brands.  You can learn enough to get started yourself and hire experts remotely to help you grow.  Your first step is finding a Canadian-friendly eCommerce platform that you and your staff can easily use, even if you’re not a techie.  Platforms like Shopify Canada are specifically designed to accommodate any size of business and all experience levels. It’s also important to find Canadian-friendly website hosting. We’re hosted on Green Geeks‘ Canadian servers.

Comment on Canadians Internet BusinessHow are you tapping into the rapidly-growing Canadian online market? Please share your questions or suggestions in the comments below.

✔ You may also be interested in reading:
Hot Canadian eCommerce Market Captivates Merchants Globally
Test eCommerce Waters with Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA)
Canadian Growth of B2C and B2B Online Shopping Continues (Statistics)
Canadians Online: Statistics to Guide Your Multi-Channel Strategy

——————————————

© CanadiansInternet.com – Content on this website (all or in part) may NOT be used elsewhere without expressed permission. Content theft will result in legal action. Thank you for respecting the effort that we have put into our original content. If you would like to have high quality content created for you, please contact our writer directly.

DISCLOSURE: We may receive compensation for links to products on this website.

COMMENTS ARE MODERATED – Legitimate comments will be published after a short delay. Spam, trolling and brand bashing will not be published.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

4 Responses to "How to Tap Into the Exploding Canadian eCommerce Market"

  1. Pascal Walters  March 8, 2017

    Love these specific, actionable tips you share Melody! Your Canadian market insight is exceptional. Do you think the Trump presidency will have any impact on U.S. competition?

    Reply
    • Melody McKinnon  March 11, 2017

      Thanks Pascal! I believe Trump’s “buy American” plans will be met in kind by the countries it targets, including Canada. If he makes it more difficult/expensive for us to export to the US, we’ll make hard for Americans to bring goods into Canada. It will mean more Canadians shopping at home and turning to other countries in both the B2C and B2B categories when the dust settles. Generally, countries outside of the US will trade more among themselves and leave the US out of it altogether. If Trump learns trade moves both ways before too much damage is done, things could go back to normal. Our tech sector is going to benefit from his anti-immigration policies, and that could mean a lot more innovation coming out of this country.

      Reply
  2. Dawson Foss  March 6, 2017

    I bet there will be many more Canadian stores online by Christmas 2017. There’s just no denying that almost every business with products or virtual services needs to be online. Even if you don’t sell online you need to be found there. The first thing ANYONE does when they’re looking for somthing is go online. They want to research and usually buy online or they go to a store they found online. It’s like having your phone number in the phone book…it HAS to be there if you want to stay in business.

    They know that but don’t want to do it for some reason. Hire someone! Get it done! I sure would hate to see Canada’s small businesses disappear because they’re afraid of the internet.

    Reply
  3. Mac Trusse  March 5, 2017

    The online shoppers are there but the Canadian businesses aren’t. I think most of them have been burying their head in the sand where they’ll suffocate. It will be the millennials that finally build a thriving ecommerce sector here. There is hope for some though! Let’s hope you don’t get tired of trying to help businesses get online.

    Reply

Leave a Reply to Melody McKinnon Cancel reply